Printed from the Society, Religion and Technology Project website: www.srtp.org.uk

Digitally Remastered: A biblical guide to reclaiming your virtual self

image Published: Nov 24, 2016

Digitally Remastered: A biblical guide to reclaiming your virtual self unpacks the practical and spiritual significance of our technological choices. 

The rise and proliferation of communications technologies is arguably the most significant development of the 21st century. The web, social networking and smartphones have pervaded every area of life and every aspect of society. The web is a democratising technology, redistributing power away from the gatekeepers who previously controlled access to information and towards ordinary citizens, much as the printing press gave the laity the ability to read the Bible in their own language.

At the same time, there are dangers inherent in our uncritical adoption of communications technologies. Like any technology, they are a tool which can be used for beneficial or harmful ends.

Digitally Remastered explores some of the key areas in which our use of communications technology affects our lives, relationships and faith. These include a critique of the ‘Always-On’ culture that both offers ready access to information and threatens constant distraction; the way we either end up saving or wasting time through our use of the web; and the question of identity and integrity in an anonymous online environment.

Central to the book is the premise of freedom vs slavery: that communications technologies make a good servant, but a terrible master.  They can be used in ways that align with our faith and make us more human, or else detract from our status as creatures made in God’s image. The book also unpacks the effects of the web on consumerism, explores issues of privacy and surveillance, and looks at some of the temptations inherent in our use of the web.

For more information or to order the book, visit https://www.muddypearl.com/books/digitally-remastered/

Printed from www.srtp.org.uk on Wed, December 13, 2017
© The Church of Scotland 2017