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All Things New: A Brief History of the First Forty Years of the Church of Scotland SRT Project

image Published: Aug 04, 2011

'All You Need Is Love' May 1970: Having assured us that “All you need is love.” the Beatles were in the process of an acrimonious break- up. The north tower of the World Trade Centre and the New English Bible were both nearing completion. The abortive Apollo 13 mission had been brought safely back to earth, the first commercial flights of a new generation of super airliner, the “jumbo jet,” had recently taken place. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation
Treaty, designed to limit the spread of nuclear weapons, had just come into effect.

The world was a very different place in 1970 to the one we know now. Science and technology have had enormous impacts on all aspects of human life, in many cases changing the way we think of ourselves and society. Most of these impacts have been positive; some have had unforeseen consequences. Many have raised ethical and moral questions as to how and where technology can and should be applied to benefit the largest number of people.

The Society, Religion and Technology (SRT) Project of the Church of Scotland was inaugurated on 1st May 1970. In the subsequent 40 years the SRT project has sought to help the church engage with ethical issues in relation to science.

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All Things New: A Brief History of the First Forty Years of the Church of Scotland SRT Project

image Published: Feb 01, 2011

An article written by John M Francis and Murdo Macdonald as featured in the Journal of Technology, Theology and Religion.

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